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It serves encryption to higher layers, which is normally the function of the presentation layer.

However, applications generally use TLS as if it were a transport layer, Early research efforts towards transport layer security included the Secure Network Programming (SNP) application programming interface (API), which in 1993 explored the approach of having a secure transport layer API closely resembling Berkeley sockets, to facilitate retrofitting pre-existing network applications with security measures.

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It builds on the earlier SSL specifications (1994, 1995, 1996) developed by Netscape Communications Client-server applications use the TLS protocol to communicate across a network in a way designed to prevent eavesdropping and tampering.

Since applications can communicate either with or without TLS (or SSL), it is necessary for the client to indicate to the server the setup of a TLS connection.

The TLS protocol aims primarily to provide privacy and data integrity between two or more communicating computer applications.

In addition to the properties above, careful configuration of TLS can provide additional privacy-related properties such as forward secrecy, ensuring that any future disclosure of encryption keys cannot be used to decrypt any TLS communications recorded in the past.

Several versions of the protocols find widespread use in applications such as web browsing, email, instant messaging, and voice over IP (Vo IP).

Websites are able to use TLS to secure all communications between their servers and web browsers.Attempts have been made to subvert aspects of the communications security that TLS seeks to provide, and the protocol has been revised several times to address these security threats (see § Security).Developers of web browsers have also revised their products to defend against potential security weaknesses after these were discovered (see TLS/SSL support history of web browsers).SSL 2.0 was prohibited in 2011 by RFC 6176, and SSL 3.0 was also later prohibited in June 2015 by RFC 7568.TLS 1.0 was first defined in RFC 2246 in January 1999 as an upgrade of SSL Version 3.0, and written by Christopher Allen and Tim Dierks of Consensus Development.The TLS protocol comprises two layers: the TLS record and the TLS handshake protocols.

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